Supre Called to Account

The following article appeared on news.com.au earlier this week, proving that people power works:

TWEEN clothing brand Supre is under fire after running sexual adverts featuring a topless model in its latest clothing campaign.
The Advertising Standards Bureau said it had received many complaints about the images that appeared in print and on buses that show young topless girls in jeggings  (a jeans-leggings cross) with only their hair covering their breasts, as well as the television commercial that contains “sexualised content”.
As a result, all Supre posters in store have been taken down and it has pulled its bus campaign.
“The board noted that the image is a large image on buses and is therefore able and likely to be seen by a very broad audience, including children,” the case report read.
“The complaints focus mainly on the sexualised content, the time slot in which the ad is shown, and also the promotion of body size,” said Sari Mattila, an ASB spokeswoman.
“The bureau is now in the process of contacting advertisers on receipt of the complaints.”
The ASB is also investigating the TV ad which features a model dancing provocatively in her bedroom.
“If the board considers that the ad breaches the code, the advertiser is asked to remove the ad,” Ms Mattila said.
The ABS case report refuted claims by Supre that it had targeted the 18-35 age group.
“The board strongly disagreed and noted that the Supre brand is attractive to and very popular with teenage and pre-teen girls,” the report read.
The jeggings campaign has also been blasted by online groups fed up with Supre’s “highly sexualised” campaigns.
“This is a continuation of Supre’s irresponsible marketing,” online group Collective Shout spokeswoman, Melinda Liszewski, said.
“Supre is very popular with 11 to 13-year-old girls.
“Collective Shout supporters have been sending complaints to Supre as these are sexualised ads aimed at a young market,” she said.
The company declined to comment.
“We are currently still working with the ASB on this so would not be able to comment until our response is finalised,” a Supre spokeswoman said.

Collective Shout featured an article on these ads on May 30, Mia Freedman posted about it yesterday and Mumbrella featured an article on Sunday. Many people were unhappy about this ad, they spoke up and now it’s gone. Hip hip hooray for people power!

In further news, high street stores in England have taken a stand and have “banned padded bras and ‘sexually suggestive’ clothes for young girls”. Read more about that here.

Credits:
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